Clergy wants sound energy plan

Clergy wants sound energy plan

By Joe Baker

By Joe Baker

Senior Editor

As the U.S. Senate prepares to vote this week on an energy plan, it has in hand a letter from more than 1,200 leaders of major religious denominations appealing for conservation, fuel efficiency and development of alternative energy.

Rev. Dr. Robert Edgar, general secretary of the National Council of Churches, said: “We’re telling the Congress that energy conservation is necessary for homeland security as well as environmental protection and justice. Lives are at stake here.”

The letter states: “…We believe that conservation and the development of the cleanest technologies possible are the wisest, most just, and most prudent means to fulfill our moral obligations to ensure the health and well-being of the American people and people around the world, now and for generations to come.”

The religious leaders told Congress that there are interfaith climate change campaigns in progress in 21 states that are instructing congregations on the link between energy conservation and renewable energy sources that benefit climate change reduction.

Illinois signatories include: the Illinois Interfaith Council on Climate Change; Ecumenical Eco-Justice Network of Elgin; Presbyterian Church, USA; Unitarian Universalist Church of Elgin; Fox Valley Presbyterian Church of Geneva; First Presbyterian Church of Elgin; and the 8th Day Center for Justice, whose sponsors include the Claretians East, USA; the Dominican Fathers and Brothers; School Sisters of Notre Dame; Priests of the Sacred Heart; Sisters of St. Joseph, Third Order of St. Francis; and Divine Word Missionaries, North America.

The interfaith group favors increased vehicle fuel economy in the shortest time possible; development and production of hybrid energy, fuel cell and other technologies; financing for inter-city rail and mass transit; and is strongly opposed to drilling in the Artic National Wildlife Refuge.

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