The golden arches of fall return to America’s street

StoryImage( ‘/Images/Story//Auto-img-116118951422378.jpg’, ‘Photo courtesy of www.thomastonhistoricalsociety.com’, ‘Has your town begun elm restoration efforts? The non-profit Elm Research Institute (ERI) of Keene, N.H., has been making it possible for municipalities, colleges, golf courses and cemeteries to restore their lost elms. It’s easy and affordable. ‘);

From press release

What’s golden and arches over Elm Street? No, it’s not McDonald’s “golden arches”—it’s the majestic American elm in its fall cloak, and it is making a fashionable comeback.

Are you one of the lucky ones who can remember how Elm Street once appeared in the fall? The rich, golden foliage on graceful, arching branches created tunnels along this street void of its namesake. Now the elms are returning to Elm Street, making the street true to its name.

Over the last 20 years, disease-resistant American Liberty Elms have been planted by the thousands, in cities and towns, all across America. You can find them gracing the streets in such places as Prescott, Ariz.; Murphys, Calif.; Gypsum and Pueblo, Colo.; New Haven, Conn.; Lakeland, Fla.; Damariscotta, Newcastle and Brunswick, Maine; Lynnfield and Wakefield, Mass.; St. Cloud, Minn.; Sayville, N.Y.; Borough of Westmont, Pa.; North Richland Hills, Texas; Fairfax, Va.; Woodstock and Rutland, Vt.; and at the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

Has your town begun elm restoration efforts? The non-profit Elm Research Institute (ERI) of Keene, N.H. has been making it possible for municipalities, colleges, golf courses and cemeteries to restore their lost elms. It’s easy and affordable.

Recently, Elm Research Institute announced two new programs to meet the ever-growing demand for large street trees. Under the Grow-To-Order Program, ERI will grow its disease-resistant American Liberty Elms to requested sizes (8 to 18 feet) for buyers placing advance orders, and at a substantial savings.

Until recently, elms in these sizes were limited in quantity. “Our new growing facilities allow us to grow trees to order, thereby saving on costs,” said John P. Hansel, ERI founder. “Now we can meet the demand for larger elms, which has been increasing.” Hansel attributes the growing demand for large street trees to the specimen Liberty Elms people are viewing in cities and towns that have been growing them for the past 10-20 years. And Hansel says, “Cities and colleges are calling us after 10-15 years of growing Liberty Elms. They tell us, ‘Our Liberty Elms are handsome, strong and healthy and over 35 feet tall. We want more of them.’”

“ERI has a second program designed to accommodate cities and universities that are celebrating milestone anniversaries. The five-year anniversary program is a tree-planting plan that delivers more than 50 disease-resistant American Liberty Elms, 10 feet tall. And that’s not all, ERI will donate a 10-foot ceremonial tree and a commemorative, custom-engraved plaque for the city or college’s special event.

It will make any anniversary event memorable and grand. And because elms are long-lived, the commemoration of the original event lives into the future, leaving a legacy for coming generations. All this, and it doesn’t take a cent out of a budget or make huge demands on anyone’s time, so it’s easy to do.

It’s called the five-Year Anniversary Elm Pledge Campaign, because in the past it has been used mainly by communities celebrating an anniversary of a town’s founding. Now, the program is open to any entity or group. Colleges and universities, corporations, and others can take advantage of this plan that leads to community beautification and restoration of classic elms.

Individuals may apply for membership and receive a free tree. For a donation of $35, ERI will send a 1- to 2-foot American Liberty Elm with a pedigree that tells why it’s the only street-proven, disease-resistant, purebred American elm with a lifetime warranty against Dutch elm disease.

American Liberty Elms grow quickly, in fact, a 1- to 2- foot tree will be 6 feet tall and worth more than $100 in a year or two.

For more information about ERI’s programs, membership, ordering trees, or to request a pledge kit to get started on fund-raising for your town’s elm restoration project, write Elm Research Institute, 11 Kit St., Keene, NH, 03431, phone 1-800-367-3567, or contact ERI by e-mail at www.libertyelm.com.

From the Oct. 18-24, 2006, issue

Enjoy The Rock River Times? Help spread the word!