Guest Column: Ideology trumps reality

October 10, 2012

By Gregory John Campbell

Intellectual, political, religious, economic, corporate and martial ideology trumps reality in America now, because a moral disconnection exists in voters’ minds between fact and reverie on the left and right.

The 2012 election is the last hurrah for the parties, as both are useless and broken. Most know this, but our refusal to discard them pepetuates the ideological result of known facts being denied, distorted and falsified by them, to serve the political needs of the faithfull, not the truthful.

Political distortion isn’t new, but the degree to which ideological necessity frames it now is. For example: Republicans claim they’re for “small” government, but endorse the largest expansion of government there is — war. That Republicans don’t recognize this doesn’t matter. Nor do they recognize America’s financial collapse was Republican crafted, not Democrat generated. This disconnection from reality occurs when the ideological takes over. Then, individual citizens become collective losers and cultural followers, leading to national disaster.

Ideology demands conceptual conformity — collective faith and belief — in the face of reality (truth), because the cultures forming them require ideology to exist. And when cultures demand doctrinal subordination no matter what — no matter the facts, truth or history — they become pathological; a dangerous situation breeding the fanaticism of (for) a Hitler.

As Paul Craig Roberts writes: “Americans elected Obama president expecting that he would restore the rule of law. Instead, he codified the Bush regime’s transgressions and added some of his own.” [i] Republicans should care about this loss but don’t, because neither party cares about the law; all they care about is control. Roberts adds: “So which do you want? The Republican panderer to the rich and Israel whose foreign policy is war or the Democrat panderer to the rich and Israel whose foreign policy is war?” [ii] As Gore Vidal noted, America has only one political party with two right wings.

It’s this moral lapse from reality that ensures little will change in November. This is how cultural pathology undermines civic discourse — we ideologically focus on “social” issues, but lose our enumerated rights. We think what happens between our legs is more important than what happens between our hearts and minds; a lose-lose proposition for all of us.

So how should we vote in November? As much as this citizen dislikes Mr. Obama’s policies, he dislikes Mr. Romney’s more. Accordingly, Mr. Obama won’t improve if he wins, but Mr. Romney will accelerate this failure if he does, especially with Mr. Ryan one step from the presidency! That any woman could vote for Mr. Ryan’s policies is a product of faith and belief, not moral clarity.

But sadly, we must choose between Coke and Pepsi. If Americans thought individually, not collectively, they could “write in” Ron Paul. But they won’t, because they don’t. Necessarily then, they’ll continue following, rather than leading. Therefore, a vote for Mr. Obama may represent a slower pace of oligarchy than Mr. Romney, but both are firmly taking our nation in that direction. This is to be expected, however, when little choice exists between tokens.

This is what happens when the cultural — the ideological — displaces the individual, the moral and the truthful. Because individuals, institutions, traditions, cultures and nations that do not examine the assumptions upon which they base their lives, and the premises upon which they act, become the unwitting victims of those assumptions and premises, when they are flawed in their moral axiomatic effect; their moral axdiomatic value. For if we are mindful of the moral consequences of our actions, we will become their unwitting victims; if we are, their willing beneficiaries. Choose what you want to be.

Gregory John Campbell was formerly involved in the health food industry and is a citizen concerned with our nation’s course and direction.

From the Oct. 10-16, 2012, issue

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