Help support Alzheimer’s research

As the Alzheimer’s Association-Central Illinois Chapter’s volunteer ambassador for the 17th Congressional District, I would like to share some very important information concerning Alzheimer’s disease and how it affects everyone.

Today, Alzheimer’s is the largest escalating health epidemic, devastating families and profoundly impacting the government budgets. In 2013, Alzheimer’s care was estimated to be $203 billion, and over the next 40 years the cumulative cost will reach $20 trillion, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Sixty percent of that cost will be borne by Medicare.

Currently, more than 5 million Americans are living with the disease, and by 2050, there could be as many as 16 million. It is not a disease affecting only the elderly. More than 200,000 patients are younger than 65; 1 in 9 are older than 65, and 1 in 3 are older than 85.

The direct cost of this care by unpaid family and friends is valued at $216.4 billion, with out-of-pocket costs at $9.1 billion. If something is not done soon, costs to Medicare and Medicaid will increase by 500 percent by 2050, according to the Alzheimer’s Association 2013 Facts and Figures report.

What can you do to help introduce change? (1) Contact your congressperson for support of the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act (S. 709/H.R. 1507), which requires Medicare coverage for clinical diagnosis, care planning for new patients and their caregivers and requires documentation of evaluation and care planning to be listed on medical records. (2) Ask for support of the National Alzheimer’s Appropriation Plan to approve $100 million for research in the 2014 fiscal budget. (3) Contact the Alzheimer’s Association-Central Illinois Chapter (800-272-3900) to make a donation of your time or money and participate in the 2013 Walk to End Alzheimer’s.

We are all in this together. Please make your voices heard and help eradicate this disease by 2025.

Cathi Sipes
Marquette Heights, Ill.

From the Sept. 25-Oct. 1, 2013, issue

2 thoughts on “Help support Alzheimer’s research

  • Oct 12, 2013 at 1:36 am
    Permalink

    Here’s an idea:

    Find a way to stop having jackarse individuals laying off regenerative medicine scientists. Personally, I recently (past month) sent an email to a research facility in Rockford, Illinois to ask if I could get a position at a lab. I have a background in medical science.

    The funny thing is, despite grants and a fair amount of money going toward this research (AND I WAS DOING ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH), there is still the business politics nature of research, whereby people lay off individuals who actually care about resolving the issues are laid off on allegations that there is not enough money to support them to keep doing the research.

    When I was laid off (not in Rockford, Illinois), I was replaced (as I believe) by some individual who was not getting paid by the research professor and instead the university. I thought it was complete B.S., too, since a fair amount of money (a large increase in money for this kind of research) occurred before I was laid off…

    Business politics, friends. Yes, all your diseases and health-related issues that can be resolved have their resolutions deterred by the political nature of academia and industrial research. You have tons of educated people who are not allowed to join research teams and resolve these issues.

    “My lab is not big enough, and I have too many people. Sorry.”

    That’s a typical excuse. People in Rockford, IL probably don’t know that, because there aren’t many research centers here. Spend some time in Chicago, IL and watch lots of people leave by 5 p.m.. Does real science stop at 5 p.m. and start the next day at 7 a.m. or 9 a.m.? NO!

    Lazy, lazy, lazy people are in charge of the research.

  • Oct 12, 2013 at 1:38 am
    Permalink

    In case it hasn’t been said before, here’s an idea:

    Find a way to stop having jackarse individuals laying off regenerative medicine scientists. Personally, I recently (past month) sent an email to a research facility in Rockford, Illinois to ask if I could get a position at a lab. I have a background in medical science.

    The funny thing is, despite grants and a fair amount of money going toward this research (AND I WAS DOING ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH), there is still the business politics nature of research, whereby people lay off individuals who actually care about resolving the issues are laid off on allegations that there is not enough money to support them to keep doing the research.

    When I was laid off (not in Rockford, Illinois), I was replaced (as I believe) by some individual who was not getting paid by the research professor and instead the university. I thought it was complete B.S., too, since a fair amount of money (a large increase in money for this kind of research) occurred before I was laid off…

    Business politics, friends. Yes, all your diseases and health-related issues that can be resolved have their resolutions deterred by the political nature of academia and industrial research. You have tons of educated people who are not allowed to join research teams and resolve these issues.

    “My lab is not big enough, and I have too many people. Sorry.”

    That’s a typical excuse. People in Rockford, IL probably don’t know that, because there aren’t many research centers here. Spend some time in Chicago, IL and watch lots of people leave by 5 p.m.. Does real science stop at 5 p.m. and start the next day at 7 a.m. or 9 a.m.? NO!

    Lazy, lazy, lazy people are in charge of the research.

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