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Tech-Friendly: Visit an interactive science education website for spring break fun

March 25, 2014

Paul Gorski

Paul Gorski

By Paul Gorski

That is just what every kid wants to do on spring break — homework. Whether it is a spring break at home or a rainy Saturday afternoon, you just might be able to get your children interested in one of the following interactive science websites.

These websites make science fun and interesting through videos, engaging graphics and multimedia presentations.

The “Science Learning Hub” at http://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/ is an educational website established by the University of Waikato in New Zealand. A bit more formal than my next recommendations, this site offers a wealth of educational science information for all school-age children. Some very interesting stories and videos can be found at http://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/Science-Stories. There, you will find videos about earthworms, tsunamis, strange liquids and more.

Brainpop.com offers more than just science fun, but I encourage you to visit the science page at http://www.brainpop.com/science/. Registration is required for some content, but there are some free videos and interactive presentations. There are videos about the planet Mars and space flight at http://www.brainpop.com/science/space/, and there are movies about animal food chains and hibernation at http://www.brainpop.com/science/ecologyandbehavior/.

I saved the best for last — interactivesites.weebly.com is a collection of links to a variety of interactive educational websites. Links to the science websites may be found at http://interactivesites.weebly.com/science.html. There, you will find links to fun sites about bugs, volcanoes, dinosaurs, the solar system and much more.

I hope it is not difficult to convince your child to visit one of these science sites. Science can be fun, depending on how the message is delivered, and these sites do make science interesting. You might find them interesting yourself.

Paul Gorski (www.paulgorski.com) has been a technology manager nearly 20 years, specializing in workflow solutions for printing, publishing and advertising computer users. Originally destined to be a chemist, his interest in computers began in college when he wrote a program to analyze data from lab instruments he hard-wired to the back of an Apple Iie.

Posted March 25, 2014

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