Tech-Friendly: Get the LG G Flex 2 and other big smartphones at U.S. Cellular

By Paul Gorski
Columnist

The new LG G Flex 2  smartphone is at U.S. Cellular and it stands out among the growing number of large smartphones in today’s phone market. It stands out because it is a large, 5.5” phone that is curved and has a certain amount of “flex” built into it. I just received one to review. I have not had it long it enough for a full review, or for a rating, but Android smartphone shoppers looking for a new phone should look at the G Flex 2.

The shape of the phone, the rear-mounted controls, the high-quality front and rear cameras, and the customized Android 5.0.1 operating system make this phone look and feel different than similar large Android-based phones from Samsung and Google/Motorola.LG_G_Flex_(2)

In my early testing, the G Flex 2 supports 4G LTE data transfers and is performing about the same as the Google-Motorola Nexus 6 that I had been testing until recently. The specifications for both of these phones are very impressive. However, I have not been impressed with the Android 5 operating system that ships with these phones. I’m giving myself some time to get used to Android “Lollipop” v5 before I offer a full review of either phone.

My first choice for large smartphone buyers is still the iPhone 6 Plus. The iPhone 6 Plus offers a brilliant screen, long battery life and the popular, and consistent, iOS 8 operating system. That said I will not buy an ultra large smartphone anytime soon – I prefer more portable models. I currently carry an Apple iPhone 5c running iOS 8.3 and a Motorola Moto G running Android 4.4.4.

If you are looking for a large-screen smartphone, look no further than the smartphone offerings at your local U.S. Cellular store. Visit U.S. Cellular online at uscellular.com.

Paul Gorski (www.paulgorski.com) has been a technology manager nearly 20 years, specializing in workflow solutions for printing, publishing, and advertising computer users. Originally destined to be a chemist, his interest in computers began in college when he wrote a program to analyze data from lab instruments he hard-wired to the back of an Apple IIe.

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